Grasshopper

algorithmic modeling for Rhino

stochastic fractal

simple stochastic fractal branching with anenome

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Comment by David Stasiuk on December 15, 2013 at 2:38am

Thanks...yes, I'll post the def soon!

Comment by mark zirinsky on December 14, 2013 at 9:25am

great work. a great organic effect. I like that you used tetrahedron based approach, with a limiting function. to my non-botanist eye, looks very much like bristlecone pine found high altitude in colorado or along the pacific coast. thanks for posting, and for outlining the logic sequence, at some point if you would share the file, highly appreciated. 

Comment by Wieland Schmidt on December 14, 2013 at 5:20am

Nice!

Comment by David Stasiuk on December 13, 2013 at 2:37pm

Comment by David Stasiuk on December 13, 2013 at 2:19pm

thanks! no...it's all really basic. just triangles as growth tips defining planes, which are offset, with each iteration being a bit smaller than the last, and then mesh quads formed along each shared edge of the trianges...the branching makes a tetrahedron from each triangular tip. the stochastic part is where the three available branch tips at each growth iteration get reduced...first, the two that are closest to a guide curve are retained, and then the remaining branches do a test where they look to see if they'll clash with any mesh that exists from a previous iteration of the loop...if they do, they cap themselves. Then weaverbird for the subdivision...I'll post the def when the next version of anenome comes out...:)

Comment by Christian Schmidts on December 13, 2013 at 2:09pm

nice! how did you do the meshing? with exoskeleton?

Comment by Arthur Mamou-Mani on December 13, 2013 at 1:45pm

Wow that's great! Any video tutorials available for it?

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